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Cyprus Cluster Mapping

CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY

The Cyprus Computer Society was established in 1984 and has more than 1,000 members. It functions as a non-profit organisation seeking to improve and promote high standards amongst ICT professionals in recognition of the impact that ICT has on employment, business, and society but also on the quality of life of citizens. The CCS plays a key role in linking Academia with Industry through the promotion of key elements of Informatics, in particular in the areas of digital literacy, professional skills, professionalism, education, training and research. www.ccs.org.cy

 


V-LINC ANALYSIS RESULTS:

  • Companies: 6 (SMEs = 6, MNCs = 0)
  • Interviews: 7
  • Individual Linkages: 133
  • Employment Range: Small (<50).


SUMMARY STATISTICS:

Note: For the Cyprus ICT sector the local region was chosen to encompass the country of Cyprus. Thus Local and National linkages are recorded in the Local geographic scope.

 

NICOSIA CONNECTIONS – CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY:

 

NATIONAL LINKAGES – CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY:


EUROPEAN LINKAGES – CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY:


INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES – CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY:


HIGHLIGHTS OF CYPRUS COMPUTER SOCIETY CLUSTER ECOSYSTEM RESULTS:

  • Cyprus’ ICT sector shows a connected national industry, with strong national linkages to industry associations (Cyprus Computer Society and CITEA) and R&D and training linkages (European University Cyprus and Research Promotion Foundation).
  • National links are most important to the surveyed firms: Of the 133 linkages recorded, 70% occur in Cyprus and approximately 60% of these 94 national links are with organisations based in the capital city Nicosia.
  • Seventy six percent of output linkages in the analysis are national, 19% are with European customers and the remaining 5% with International customers, suggesting a major overreliance on the national market.
  • Research and Development linkages were the 2nd most frequent category, the majority of which occur at an EU level rather than with national or international partners. Of these national R&D links, 75% were linkages with academic and research institutes, highlighting a lack of research links with industry partners.
  • ICT firms in Cyprus source almost 90% of their specialist services from within the country; however just more than half of their inputs are sourced nationally, these national links however are extremely important to the firms, with all reported in the high and medium perceived significance bands. 
  • While some of the elements required for an ICT cluster are in place in Cyprus, a number of key elements are missing from the potential cluster. The V-LINC analysis finds very little evidence of cooperation (industry peer linkages) and linkages to government agencies among Cyprus’ ICT sector, a strong contradiction with Porter’s cluster theory.
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